HIV positive

HIV+ Gay Nigerian Kenny Brandmuse Urges Buhari to Strike Out Gay Law

Gay Nigerian man living with HIV, Kenny Brandmuse, has congratulated Muhammadu Buhari on his win in the presidential elections. He also urged the president-elect to do good by the gay people in Nigeria by striking out the anti-gay laws introduced by the Jonathan administration. Brandmuse said in his Facebook post: "Now, the real hard work begins. Let's test our democracy and make real demands like electricity and good roads.

Nigerian Author and Marketing Exec Kehinde Bademosi Comes Out as Gay

Kehinde Bademosi, founder of Nigerian marketing school Orange Academy, has come out as gay in a public posting on Facebook. In a similar move Bademosi publically disclosed his HIV-positive status last December on World AIDS Day. Bademosi’s latest announcement coincides with the one-year anniversary of Nigeria’s Same Sex Marriage Prohibition Act being signed into law by president Goodluck Jonathan.

Black Gay Couples Nearly Twice More Violent, Study Says

An annual "Intimate Partner Violence" report by The National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs says that black gay couples are almost twice as likely to be stalked and/or abused by their partner. What's up with that? Here are come charts from their website with key findings.

62% of LGBTQ IPV survivors are people of colour

LGBTQ Black/African American people are more likely to experience physical violence from intimate partners

Substantial Proportion of Male HIV Infections Labelled as 'Heterosexual Exposure' in the UK Probably Due to Sex with Other Men

Up to a fifth of HIV infections among black African men initially classified as 'heterosexual exposure' in the UK are likely to have been acquired as a result of sex with other men, investigators report in the online edition of "AIDS". Using a technique called phylogenetic analysis, the authors identified clusters of HIV transmissions involving people diagnosed with HIV in the UK between 1996 and 2008. Overall, 29% of heterosexual people were in transmission clusters that only involved men who have sex with men (MSM).

Comparisons of Disparities and Risks of HIV Infection in Black and Other Men Who Have Sex with Men in Canada, UK and USA

We analysed 7 studies from Canada, 13 from the UK, and 174 from the USA. In every country, black MSM were as likely to engage similarly in serodiscordant unprotected sex as other MSM. Black MSM in Canada and the USA were less likely than other MSM to have a history of substance use (odds ratio, OR, 0·53, 95% CI 0·38–0·75, for Canada and 0·67, 0·50–0·92, for the USA).

Common Roots: A Contextual Review of HIV Epidemics in Black Men Who Have Sex with Men Across the African Diaspora

Pooled estimates from across the African diaspora show that black men who have sex with men (MSM) are 15 times more likely to be HIV positive compared with general populations and 8·5 times more likely compared with black populations. Disparities in the prevalence of HIV infection are greater in African and Caribbean countries that criminalise homosexual activity than in those that do not criminalise such behaviour.

Black Gay Men in the UK Almost Twice as Likely to Have HIV as White Men

A new analysis of existing studies on the sexual health of black gay men in the UK has found that despite having similar sexual risk behaviours to white gay men, they have almost twice the chance of being HIV-positive. The findings are published in a special issue of "The Lancet" on men who have sex with men, published last week to coincide with the 19th International AIDS Conference.

Epidemiology of HIV Among Black and Minority Ethnic Men Who Have Sex with Men in England and Wales

Between 1997-2002, BME MSM accounted for just over one in 10 new HIV diagnoses among MSM in England and Wales; more than half probably acquired their infection in the United Kingdom. In 2002, the proportion of BME MSM living with diagnosed HIV in England and Wales was significantly higher than white MSM. Undiagnosed HIV prevalence in Caribbean-born MSM was high. These data confirm the need to remain alert to the sexual health needs and evolving epidemiology of HIV among BME MSM in England and Wales.

Living with HIV

Living with an HIV or AIDS diagnosis can be a difficult and stressful reality for many people. If you need someone to talk to, or are looking to meet other positive people from a similar cultural background, give the NPL Resilient Futures team a call. More on Living with HIV.

What is PEP?

PEP is a course of HIV medication which you can take if you have been at risk of HIV infection. The course of HIV medication lasts about 28 days and, if taken within 72 hours of putting yourself at risk, may be able to prevent you from becoming infected with HIV. PEP stands for Post Exposure Prophylaxis – in other words it is a form of protection (against HIV) that you can take after you have taken a risk or had a condom break on you. PEP FAQs.

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